Maisonnette Bistro: Best drinks in Quebec

Maisonnette Bistro: Les meilleures boissons au Québec

L’une des provinces du Canada, le Québec, n’est pas particulièrement connue pour ses boissons hors du monde et qui changent la vie. Cependant, il y a pas mal de boissons que vous devez absolument acheter dès votre arrivée dans les limites de la ville. Vérifiez les boissons suivantes dont vous avez besoin pour siroter et siroter rapidement ici au Maisonnette Bistro:

  1. Vin de glace
  2. Caribou
  3. Sortilege Whisky à l’érable
  4. Acajou

L’une des boissons les plus populaires en Europe et au Canada est le cocktail appelé Acajou. C’est un mélange puissant d’alcool qui attirera certainement votre attention et

  1. Yukon Jack.

L’une des choses que vous devez essayer est la liqueur Yukon Jack. Il est communément appelé le mouton noir du monde de l’alcool au Canada, mais vous ne pouvez pas le manquer. Il a un goût fort, doux et doux avec une saveur d’épices et de vanille qui peut vous rendre accro en une seule fois. Il est certainement facile en bouche, mais assurez-vous de l’associer avec des aliments frais et d’agrumes, afin de ne pas dominer votre palais avec une douceur manifeste.

Vous pouvez boire le Yukon Jack seul ou mélangé à un cocktail. Cependant, si vous l’essayez pour la première fois, il est préférable de le boire seul pour en apprécier pleinement le goût.

Maisonnette Bistro: Quebec as our beloved source of inspiration

Maisonnette Bistro: Quebec as our beloved source of inspiration 

Maisonnette Bistro is proud to be a part of the wonderful city of Montreal, Quebec. It is also an endless source of inspiration for us from the food and drinks we serve to the entire atmosphere of our bistro. 

If you want to find out more about our bistro and why we are here, the rich history and culture of Quebec can give you great insight. Learn more about Quebec and the bistro here!

Maisonnette Bistro: Tracing the history of Quebec 

The rise of Quebec can be traced back from 1534 to 1535 when French explorer Jacques Cartier set foot at present-day Gaspé. In the name of the king of France, he claimed the land and brought with him the 16th-century European traditions to some Indian (First Nations) and Inuit tribes (the Arctic people of Canada) occupying the land for thousands of years.

It was in 1608 when the name Quebec was bestowed on the land. It is an Algonquian word that means ‘where the river narrows’, alluding to the present-day St. Lawrence River and the pastoral Orleans Island.

Shortly after that, permanent European settlers came into a fort established by Samuel de Champlain. It was called Stadacona but is now known as Quebec City. In the next years, more French territories were built that made way for the foundation of New France in 1760.

After the Treaty of Paris in 1763, New France was ceded to Great Britain. However, the British Empire faced a revolution of independence for a decade. With unrest growing in the colonies, the British produced the Quebec Act of 1774 to give the Canadians their first Charter of Rights including the official recognition of the French language and culture.

Maisonnette Bistro: Exploring the culture of Quebec

Quebec is the home of most French-speaking communities in Canada. This gives the province a distinct cultural identity that can be seen in their Quebec nationalism. Its culture also links its historic French roots with its aboriginal heritage, as well as the contributions of recent immigrants and the English-speaking part of North America.

With the influence of Francophone social values, Quebec has a distinct society that fosters a ‘Québécois’ national culture. Be that as it may, Canada has been an increasingly multicultural place throughout the years, giving way to other cultural influences.

Since it became a meeting place for cultures, Quebec features social aspects that include representations in all traditional displays of high culture. This also consists of a long-lasting legacy of jazz and rock music, as well as unique facets in visual arts, theatre, music, and dance.

The proud Canadian truism that involves maple syrup came from Quebec. It was first harvested in the province by farmers in Cabanes à Sucres (meaning ‘sugar shacks’). French-Canadian folk songs such as Alouette or Les Raftsmen often talk about such farm life, as well as other rural chores and exploring the wild.

Moreover, the city of Montreal was dubbed Canada’s Cultural Capital by a known magazine. It is the country’s hub for French-language TV productions, radio, theatre, film, multimedia, and print publishing.

Maisonnette Bistro: Taste the rich history and culture of Quebec in our food

In terms of food, Quebec customs view cooking as one of the fine arts. This is partly because of the influx of migrants coming in the province from the 1960s to the 1970s. The foreign settlers came from many parts of the world, mainly from Italy, Belgium, Switzerland, and France.

Due to their French roots, the upper-class people of Quebec society have a passion for fine dining. While Vancouver is highly concentrated with fine cuisine restaurants, the city of Montreal follows it closely. 

Because of their love for food, even small towns take pride in their world-class restos where the chefs and cooks have global reputations. Aside from the distinct flavours of the Québécois cuisine, food from Quebec proudly boasts dishes from the Americas, Northern Africa, Asia, and Europe.

Quebec is the home of dishes that are widely known throughout the rest of Canada, in the northern United States and abroad such as:

  • Poutine – It is a dish that emerged in the late 1950s in the Centre-du-Québec area. It consists of french fries and cheese curds. Brown gravy is poured over it before serving. 
  • Tourtières – It is a meat pie dish that is usually made with minced pork, veal, or beef, and potatoes. Traditionally, it is served as part of the Christmas réveillon and New Year’s Eve meal in Quebec.
  • Pâté chinois – It is a savoury casserole pie that is similar to the English shepherd’s pie or the French hachis Parmentier. It has layers of ground beef sauteed with diced onions, canned corn, and mashed potatoes. Pickled eggs or beets are sometimes added to the layers. Sometimes, it can be served with ketchup.
  • Soupe aux pois (yellow pea soup) – It is another traditional dish that drew influence from Maine and Vermont cuisines. Whole yellow peas are used with salt-cured pork and herbs for flavour. 
  • Fèves au lard (baked beans with lard) – It is similar to Boston baked beans but instead of molasses, it uses maple syrup to give the beans a smoky and sweet taste. It is also served with salt pork.
  • Cretons spread – It is a forcemeat-style pork spread that also has onions and spices. It is usually eaten with toast as part of the traditional Québécois breakfast.
  • Grands-Pères au Sirop d’Érable (maple syrup dumplings) – It is a dessert dumpling dish that is made of ball-shaped cakes cooked in maple syrup. It is usually served in the sugar season in the sugar shacks.
  • Pouding chômeur (unemployed man pudding) – It is a dessert cake with a layer of hot syrup or caramel on it. It was believed that female factory workers created the dish in the Great Depression.
  • Tire Ste-Catherine (St. Catherine’s taffy) – It is a variety of taffy made to celebrate the feast date of Saint Catherine of Alexandria. Traditionally, it was made by unmarried women for eligible men.

Most of the classic dishes of Quebec are centred on the holidays. Réveillon which is the Christmas Eve (or New Year’s Eve) feast usually highlights dishes such as a bûche de Noël and tourtières. During the spring, the sugar season also influences the cuisine of the province. It is one of the oldest culinary traditions in Quebec.

Maisonnette Bistro: Why Quebec is the driving force behind the bistro’s food

Here at Maisonnette Bistro, we take pride in our eclectic cuisine that is inspired by the flavours and textures known in Quebec, Canada. Our goal is to be a mirror of Quebec from its rich history to its unique culture. 

A majority of the people living in the province remain ethnic French-Canadians who are the descendants of a fairly small group of 17th-century colonial settler families. Due to this, the Quebec culture including its cuisine is strongly rooted in that community’s age-old shared rural past.

As proud Quebecers, we at Maisonnette Bistro put all our effort in preserving the historic identity of our province in the face of considerable social and technological change. Be that as it may, we are still open to the influences of other cultures that found their way in Canada.

Enjoy a wide range of Québécois food from traditional dishes to haute cuisine. The bistro specializes in regional cuisine but our chef and his team are continuously crafting contemporary dishes inspired by Quebec and the world.

Our deep love for the province and the city of Montreal can be seen not just in our food but also in our place. The bistro boasts a contemporary market kitchen while the dining area has an eclectic mix of regional cuisine and high-class dining experience. 

Enjoy a great meal here at Maisonnette Bistro. Have fun with friends at our sleek cocktail lounge. You can also spend time with your family at the indoor tables or our spacious terrace. Be welcomed by our warm and friendly bistro staff. 

It is our utmost goal to form a community with the great people of Quebec. We will make sure you have the best dining experience here and cater to your every need and request from reservations, allergy notices, vegetarian and vegan options, and more. 

Moreover, we pride ourselves on creating a place of exploration here at Maisonnette Bistro. It is a space where the love and creativity of the chef and his team can be seen in each dish served in the bistro. With this, we guarantee a one of a kind culinary experience in Quebec!

Maisonnette Bistro: Visit us!

Make great memories with us! Follow us on our official social media accounts on Facebook, Instagram, and Trip Advisor. You can also contact us for more information, queries, bookings, and more.

Maisonette Bistro: Must-try foods in Quebec

Maisonette Bistro: Must-try foods in Quebec

Food is one of the most important cultural indicators of a country. Every ingredient and way of cooking used represents the uniqueness and heritage of a nation’s identity. It is often said that to understand a culture, you can do it by learning local cuisines and methods of cooking. 

In Quebec, their food heritage was deeply influenced by French and Irish cuisine when immigrants settled in the 18000s. However, according to some historical accounts, Quebec’s cuisine started to flourish in the 16th century. During this time, locals also learned some cooking methods from the Algonquins and Iroquois. 

One of the most popular methods that is still used to this day is the ‘l’acericulture’, which is a technique used to harvest maple sap for Quebec’s world-renowned maple syrup.

More of French cuisine influences became more pervasive during the 1670s when a large group of colonizers settled in the city. During this time, meals always included soup, bread, meat, and wine. 

However, drastic changes happened during the Conquest of New France because products such as wine were banned from entering the city. Moreover, bread, which was the most in-demand staple food in the country, was suddenly replaced by potato. Production and consumption of sweets also increased. 

Quebec’s culinary history is colourful and exciting. Tourists from other countries flock their restaurants to get a taste of their world-class dishes. Are you curious to know more? Here are some of the most popular dishes you can find in Quebec:

Poutine 

For gastronomes touring Quebec, their highly recommended food is the poutine. At first glance, this dish may seem plain, but the pile of fries topped with a thick dollop of cheese curds and gravy is often called a culinary renaissance that’s spreading across the globe.  

Just how delicious is this dish? Well, it already has a gourmet counterpart in big cities such as New York. Even the popular magazine, The New York Times, said that they were excited that Poutine arrived at the shores of Manhattan. 

Who wouldn’t relish in this dish? Thick cuts of fresh potato garnished with flavourful gravy and white cheese is so mouth-watering that people celebrate a day just for this food called ‘Poutine Week’.

Want to make your own poutine? Here’s a simple recipe you can try at home: 

  • 1-quart vegetable oil for frying. You can also use oils of your choice. 
  • 1 (10.25 ounce) can beef gravy
  • 5 medium potatoes, cut into fries
  • 2 cups cheese curds
  • A pinch of salt 
  • Kitchen towels to drain excess oil.

How to cook your poutine: 

  1. Take 1-quart of vegetable oil and heat it in a skillet over medium heat. While your oil is heating, you can begin preparing your gravy. Make sure you don’t underheat the pan, otherwise your poutine’s will stick.
  2. If you think your oil is hot enough, you can now put your fries one at a time. Cook until brown. Make sure you don’t fill the pan with fries in order to cook evenly. You can do them in batches just to make sure they’re well-fried. Once done, use a strainer to drain the oil. Place them on a plate with kitchen paper to remove excess oil.
  3. Once done, sprinkle your fries with a pinch of salt to taste. Take the gravy top the fries. Add the cheese curds after. Use a ladle to spread evenly and viola! You’re very own poutines ready to serve!

Bagels in Montreal 

People who say that New York has the best bagel haven’t probably tasted Montreal’s heavenly bagels. Baked to perfection and topped with the best sesame seeds, Montreal bagels are a treat for people who are always on the go. The best bagels in the country can be found in St-Viateur and Fairmount Bagel. Additionally, people can buy delicious bagels in grocery stores 24/7. 

Crepes 

Crepe is popular as a French food but it’s also popular in Quebec. What makes crepes delicious is that it’s topped with fresh slices of fruits such as berries and bananas covered with a generous amount of chocolate syrup or whipped cream. While pancakes are classic breakfast staples, crepes offer a fresh selection of variants that you can enjoy. 

Want to enjoy crepes at home? Here’s a simple recipe you can follow: 

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ cup milk
  • ½ cup of water
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • Fruits, preferably bananas and berries
  • Whipped cream

How to cook crepes: 

  • Using a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour and eggs then slowly add the milk and butter. Slowly stir until the mixture is fluffy. Once you’ve achieved the right consistency, slowly add the butter and salt to add taste. Whisk again until the mixture is smooth and without any lumps. 
  • In a flat skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Take a ladle and scoop the batter. Make sure that each crepe has at least ¼ cup. To cook evenly, tilt the pan in circular motions. 
  • Cook your crepes for at least 2 minutes until lightly browned. Make sure you don’t burn them. If you think the crepes are evenly cooked, loosen them with a spatula then flip them over to cook the other side. 
  • Once cooked, take the fruit chunks you sliced and top with whipped cream or chocolate, depending on your preference. 

Smoked Meat Sandwiches 

Aside from bagel, another favourite dish in Quebec is smoked meat sandwich. With its fatty and salty taste, this delicious sandwich is often compared with New York’s pastrami. What makes smoked meat sandwiches delicious is that the meat used for this is marinated with different spices that make the flavour seep in the fillings. 

Cheese 

If you think France is the only country with good cheese, think again. Quebec is actually one of the large producers of cheese in the world. If you visit Quebec, you’ll find a whole street selling artisan cheese that will make your mouth water. Moreover, people know their cheese, so if you’re a first-time shopper in the cheese, you can ask around. 

Usually, Eastern towns in the country are considered as the suppliers of dairy products. Aside from cheese, they also have raw milk and all kinds of cheeses. 

Feves Au Lard 

Also known as beans with fat, Feves au lard is baked beans glazed with a thick helping maple syrup that is usually served at the breakfast table. In earlier times, travellers from the country often consider this food as a staple breakfast meal. Because it’s rich in vitamins and minerals, it was consumed before people started their day. It’s usually paired with bread or sometimes rice. 

One of the most popular places in Quebec that served feves au lard is La Binerie Mont-Royal. They’ve been serving world-class feves au lard for 75 years so you can never go with this dish. 

Creton 

If you enjoy breakfast, Quebecans enjoy a dish called creton. This food is often used as a spread and is made of salted pork that has a texture of a pate. It’s usually used on bread or other main dishes. 

Shish Taouk 

The shish taouk is the Montreal version of chicken shawarma. This dish is made of chicken sliced to pieces then marinated in different spices. Once the chicken is done, it will be stuffed in pita bread then roasted again for extra crust and texture. 

Sometimes they add veggies and hummus to add extra flavour to the chicken meat. However, in some parts of the country, if you ask for ‘shawarma’ they will most likely serve you with meat. So just specify that you want a shish taouk.  

Lamb in Charlevoix

Charlevoix is one of the most popular and delicious foods in Quebec cuisine. Because of its wide-spread popularity, some producers of the lamb implemented a law to have it legally protected just like the French Champagne and the Italian Parma. 

Try these foods now at Maisonette Bistro!

Here at Maisonette Bistro, you can try all these decadent dishes and more. We offer a wide selection of authentic cuisines, so reserve a table now to get a taste of these mouth-watering foods! 

How to reserve a table: 

  • Visit our website and sign up using your email address. Once done, select a schedule you want and click ‘reserve’.
  • Please remember that you can opt to pay a day before the actual date. However, please be reminded that if you want to cancel, please remind us ahead of time so we can give it to other people waiting in the reservation list. 
  • Additionally, please refer to our payment options to know what payment options we accept. Moreover, if you decide to pay in the restaurant, please provide us with a hard copy of your reservation form and present it at the counter so we can settle your dining reservations accordingly.